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whole plant hemp oil vs cbd isolate

“From a quality perspective, I personally prefer non-refined extracts,” Stem said. “This whole plant extract contains minor phytocannabinoids — like CBG, CBC, etc. — and a range of terpenes, many of which have established effects in their own right, and contribute to what is called the entourage effect.”

CBD distillate is made by distilling unrefined extract under high heat and vacuum pressure to capture the CBD and leave the other components behind, Stem said. Isolate goes one step further: It is refined using pentane, causing the CBD to crystallize. It is then filtered and dried, creating final products that are up to 99.9% pure CBD.

In contrast, CBD oil is extracted from the leaves and flowers of hemp plants, which contain a large variety of cannabinoids and terpenes, including CBD. Oil extracted from the leaves and flowers of such plants is therefore rich in CBD.

What type of CBD oil is best?

Compounding the confusion, there are several different categories of CBD oil products, including hemp-derived oil, full-spectrum hemp extract, and isolate, to name just a few. Then there’s the issue of the ubiquitous “hemp oil,” which may or may not mean the same thing as CBD oil. Finally, shoppers walking through their local health food store may encounter yet another type of hemp oil product — hemp seed oil.

There are two main sources of CBD oil – hemp and marijuana plants. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

Farmers are growing so-called craft hemp often on a small scale, with high-CBD strains to better reap the compound’s therapeutic potential. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

To summarize: hemp oil may refer to CBD oil derived from CBD-rich flowers and leaves of hemp plants, or it may refer to hemp seed oil, which is made from hemp seeds only and, while highly nutritious, does not contain CBD. If you’re buying hemp oil specifically for CBD, make sure you are not accidentally getting hemp seed oil.

This is cannabidiol in its purest form – it is extracted from the plant and processed to remove all of the oils, plant material, waxes, chlorophyll, and more, leaving behind the pure Cannabidiol. It is most often found in the form of white powder or crystals.

We are big believers in a holistic approach to healing. There is rarely, if ever, a “magic pill” or even one solution to any problem. As career bodyworkers, we know that our clients will get the best results from the work we do if they treat their pain from many angles. In addition to getting bodywork, we suggest they use topical pain relievers, soothe sore muscles in an Epsom soak, make changes in their lifestyle to reduce stress, move their bodies more, and get more sleep. We’ve seen time and again that the people who treat their pain from this holistic approach get far better results than those who rely on one – isolated if you will – method of healing.

Full Spectrum/Whole-Plant Extract or Oil

This term is used to describe the healing effect that plant materials may have by working together rather than alone – the idea being that a plant is more than the sum of its parts when it comes to therapeutic benefit.

For those just getting familiar with cannabidiol (CBD), the terms “full spectrum” and “CBD isolate” may not mean much to you. You have probably wondered what the difference is and which one you should choose when considering a CBD product. Here is a summary of how they differ and which we feel is a better choice.

As with most information relating to the study and effects of cannabis, there are few quality double-blind studies to prove the entourage effect. This does not mean, however, that there isn’t growing scientific evidence to suggest that the theory may hold true. Many scientists agree that CBD mitigates some of the effects of THC by blocking cannabinoid receptors (thereby helping to reduce some of the associated anxiety or paranoia that THC can induce). A 2015 study demonstrated the superior therapeutic properties of whole plant hemp extracts compared to single-molecule CBD.