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topical cbd dosage for pain

While further research and educational tools are required to pinpoint the optimal CBD dosage for each individual, existing studies can help narrow down the best CBD dosages for certain ailments and medical conditions. For instance, Mayo Clinic, the U.S.-based nonprofit academic medical center, released a review that can be used as a starting point for THC and CBD dosage measurements for various ailments, combining scientific research, publications, and traditional and expert opinions. Based on information in the review, it might be helpful to start with a dose of 2.5 – 10mg of CBD to reduce anxiety or 160mg for inflammation.

These days CBD can be found nearly anywhere in almost anything. There are CBD lattes at the local café, an ever-growing array of beauty products, and CBD is even stacked on the shelves of pharmacy chains located across the U.S. It’s not hard to find CBD oil and CBD-infused products, but finding the most effective CBD dosage, on the other hand, well, that’s an entirely different story.

The total amount of CBD and amount per serving size should always be clearly showcased on your product’s label. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

Consider the ailment or condition

While sifting through the vast ocean of CBD oils and infusions now available online and in health and wellness sections across the US, it’s important to know what to look for in order to find the best possible products.

One 2006 literature review published in Medical Hypothesis suggests that CBD can improve the therapeutic benefits and reduce the adverse effects of THC. Other research appears to support the view that CBD and THC have a positive synergistic effect when combined. For instance a 2012 study found that cannabis consumers with a higher intake of CBD had better recall memory. There is also evidence suggesting that CBD can reduce anxiety and paranoia, two side effects commonly associated with THC.

For instance, in a November 2017 study, researchers tested 84 CBD products from 31 companies. Only 30.95% of the samples were accurately labeled with the correct amount of CBD.

There are a lot of different CBD products on the market, and each requires different considerations when it comes to the optimal CBD dosage. This diverse array of CBD product types includes:

While some studies have shown that dosages up to 1,500mg a day are not only tolerated but safe, we recommend starting with a low dosage. From there, work your way up based on how the Hemp Extract Oil makes you feel so as to avoid taking too much.

While finding the right CBD dosage , consider the ailments and symptoms you are seeking to alleviate. Scientific research suggests that CBD Oil may benefit a diverse array of afflictions and conditions, including anxiety, inflammation, arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, migraines, pain, premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and sleep. While each symptom requires a different dosage of CBD Oil to be most effective, it’s recommended to start low to help mitigate adverse effects or allergic reactions.

When implementing a CBD Oil regimen into your daily wellness routine, it is recommended to initially start with a small dosage of CBD Oil . As an example, you may start with a 10-15mg dosage daily during the first week. If you aren’t experiencing any alteration, you may try increasing the dosage to 20mg daily in the second week. Continue to incrementally increase the CBD Oil dosage until you intrinsically feel the effectiveness and it consistently provides relief.

Start With a Low Dose of CBD

In different clinical studies, CBD doses vary from as low as 20mg per day up to 1,500mg per day. WHO, The World Health Organization, even reports CBD dosages that range between 100mg per day and 800mg per day in some scientific studies. This then begs the question, “What is the maximum dose of CBD you should take?”

Clinical studies for CBD and Hemp Extract are very much in their infancy in comparison to medical research for other natural compounds. Experts still don’t have enough data or understanding around the potential long-term effects of using CBD. For this reason alone, we encourage you to discuss CBD usage and dosage with your doctor first.

In 2019, a clinical study performed on mice revealed potential safety concerns around CBD’s interactions with other medications as well as CBD’s affect on the liver. While these mice were exposed to larger doses of CBD, it is still important to know; and before taking any supplement, it is always recommended to speak with your doctor first.

The only thing that comes close is a Phase 2 clinical trial using a proprietary CBD transdermal gel (meaning it’s meant to go through the skin into the bloodstream) in 320 patients with knee osteoarthritis over 12 weeks, which has not been peer-reviewed to date. Unfortunately, in almost all of the study’s measures of pain, those who received CBD didn’t have statistically different scores from those who got placebo. But “they found some reductions in pain and improvements in physical function,” Boehnke says.

“It might be that cannabidiol by itself is helpful for pain, but at this point we don’t know that,” Cooper says.

But at this point, we have no idea how deep the commercially available creams are penetrating. And even if they’re getting to that sweet spot in your skin, we don’t know how much CBD is getting there or how much is necessary to provide an effect.

Here’s what the research says about using CBD for pain.

You don’t need me to tell you that CBD (cannabidiol) is everywhere. You can eat it, you can drink it, you can vape it, you can even bathe in it. And although there’s still plenty to learn about this fascinating little compound, fans of it claim that it has some pretty impressive benefits—particularly when it comes to managing pain.

If you’re ingesting something that only has CBD in it and no THC, you won’t have significant effects in the brain. This is why CBD is often referred to as being “non-psychoactive,” although that’s clearly a bit of an oversimplification because it does do something to the central nervous system.

But that’s not quite as exciting for CBD as it sounds: “We don’t know cannabidiol’s effects on its own,” says Cooper, who was part of the National Academies committee that put together this report. “[The conclusions about cannabis and cannabinoids] were based on what we know about THC or THC plus cannabidiol.”

And even though the lotion was applied topically in the rat study, it wasn’t applied locally to the knee. Instead, the researchers were really using the topical application to get it into the rats’ bloodstream, or what’s called systemic administration. But you’d likely need a different dose for it to be effective locally (if you applied it just to your aching shoulder, for instance) in a human. We have no idea what that dose should look like.