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thc free cbd oil

For starters, THC is a cannabinoid similar to CBD, but it's more commonly known for its psychotropic effects (THC is the ingredient in marijuana that delivers a "high"). Full-spectrum hemp extracts may contain up to 0.3 percent THC by law, but THC-free CBD oils go through more extensive distillation and purification processes to remove any detectable levels and ensure you're not ingesting any THC at all (not even that tiny 0.3 percent). 

Broad-spectrum CBD products may contain low levels of terpenes and minor cannabinoids (basically, variations of CBD), but still exclude THC. In turn, these products include a "broad spectrum" of plant compounds. It's generally thought that both broad- and full-spectrum CBD offer more therapeutic effects compared to CBD isolate due to the various plant compounds within each, which work together inside the body.

What Is THC-Free CBD Oil?

Whatever the reason, more people are considering THC-free CBD oil, but the question is: Will a quality THC-free CBD oil have the same benefits as a full-spectrum option? (Related: Here's How to Buy the Best Safe and Effective CBD Products)

Additionally, in the THC-free category, you'll find two types of products: broad-spectrum extracts and CBD isolate.

Regardless of which type of hemp oil you choose, it's important to buy from a brand that implements third-party lab testing (and makes the results publicly available). These tests are performed by accredited, independent labs to verify the cannabinoid composition of a product, which ensures it's truly THC-free, among other things. In addition, lab testing procedures check for CBD potency-or the strength of the product-as well as to ensure unwanted chemicals are not present. Not all brands will lab test their CBD products, but it's best to steer clear of those that don't.

There are three major types of CBD oil: broad-spectrum, full-spectrum, and CBD isolate. Full-spectrum CBD oil contains other compounds from the cannabis plant, such as terpenes, other cannabinoids, and a maximum of 0.3 percent THC. On the other hand, broad-spectrum and CBD isolate are both THC-free CBD oil forms. We compared some of the most popular THC-free CBD oils to find the best ones available to buy online, based on potency, transparency around third-party lab testing, brand reputation, customer reviews, price, and other ingredients used.

Keep in mind  that you don't always have to ingest CBD by dropping it under your tongue. You could also add your CBD drops to your food and drink to make it more palatable, or if you have localized pain or soreness, you may want to try a topical CBD product.

These are the 5 best THC-free CBD oils:

 Other things to consider:

Broad-spectrum CBD and CBD isolate are two THC-free types you may consider. Broad-spectrum contains some of the other beneficial cannabis plant compounds found in full-spectrum CBD, but it is still THC-free. On the other hand, CBD isolate is the purest form of CBD, and therefore contains no other cannabis compounds.

When you're starting to take any CBD product, you'll want to begin with a very low dose and gradually increase only as tolerated. The amount of CBD a person may take in a day will vary depending on weight, how long you have been taking CBD, and the desired effect, for example. Research shows that those with anxiety may require single doses of 300 to 600 milligrams daily to feel benefit. You should work with your healthcare provider to find the dose that is right for you. 

Most CBD oils utilize a process known as supercritical fluid extraction. It sounds pretty complicated… and it is, but you don’t have to be a rocket scientist to understand the basics. This extraction method uses a very specific type of solvent that fluctuates between solid, liquid and gaseous states, known as supercritical.

“The interaction of CBD with CB2 receptors is more complex, but like Δ9-THC, CBD is believed to reduce the inflammatory response. CBD’s action with the CB2 receptor is just one of several pathways by which CBD can affect neuroinflammation” -University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 2018

CBDistillery Broad Spectrum Oil

If you’re concerned about THC content, here’s what you need to know. The first thing you’ll want to do is check the labels on the product or website you are buying it from. It should say 100% THC-free, non-THC, no-THC, non-psychoactive, CBD isolate based, broad spectrum, etc. You want to avoid labels that say full spectrum, less than 0.3% THC, or any type of CBD:THC ratio.

The purpose of broad-spectrum CBD oil is to achieve the entourage effect, which is the synergistic interaction between cannabinoids and terpenes. Broad spectrum CBD oils provide more of the spectrum than isolate-based CBD oils, just not the “full spectrum”, which necessarily includes THC.

If you really want to be diligent, you should look at the independent lab test results for the CBD oil you are looking to buy. If they don’t have lab test results, then you should probably look into another brand. Go on the company’s website or scan the QR code located on the bottle or package. They generally will display a breakdown of the various cannabinoids including THC and CBD. The THC part should either say 0% or “ND”, which means no THC content was detected.