Posted on

medicaid cbd oil

The MRTA creates a first in the nation comprehensive regulatory structure to oversee the licensure, cultivation, production, distribution, sale and taxation of medical cannabis, adult-use cannabis, and cannabinoid hemp within New York State.

The NYS Department of Health urges all New Yorkers to stop using vape products until the definitive cause of reported vaping-associated serious pulmonary (lung) illnesses nationwide can be better determined. Since the investigation into the illnesses began, there have been no reports of adverse events associated with approved products in the NYS Medical Marijuana Program related to the outbreak. Medical marijuana products are approved by the Department and rigorously tested for contaminants, pesticides and concentration of cannabinoids, including, but not limited to Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD). However, out of an abundance of caution, we are also urging patients in the medical marijuana program to consult with their health care providers on potential alternatives to vaping products while the investigation continues.

Guidance on Use of Vaping Products for Medical Marijuana Patients

For information regarding the MRTA and Adult-Use Cannabis visit the New York State Office of Cannabis Management website at: www.cannabis.ny.gov.

For more information about vaping-associated illnesses, click here.

Please continue to monitor this website for any future updates to the medical cannabis program.

No, Medicaid, nor any other insurance, will pay for CBD (cannabidiol) oil. This holds true even if it is prescribed by a physician.

Will Medicaid pay for CBD oil? What if prescribed by a doctor?

To explain, despite the growing popularity of using CBD to treat medical conditions, it has not been approved by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) for this purpose. That said, there is one exception that exists. In June of 2018, the FDA approved a prescription CBD medication, Epidiolex, which is used to treat two types of epilepsy. Please note that this is the only CBD product for which Medicaid will pay.

Further complicating the use of CBD oil for medicinal purposes, and Medicaid coverage, is that the DEA (United States Drug Enforcement Agency) still classifies CBD oil as a Schedule I Drug, the same class of drugs as heroin and ecstasy. As a side note, any FDA-approved CBD product with no greater than 0.1% THC (tetrahydrocannabinols) are considered to be Schedule V Drugs. This class of drugs has a low potential for abuse and contains some cough and anti-diarrhea medications.