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making cbd isolate

We mentioned choosing a carrier oil that supports how you want to use the CBD you create. All four of the carrier oils we recommended (MCT, coconut, canola, olive) are edible, making any of them an excellent choice for adding CBD to your food or drink or taking the CBD orally. The benefits of CBD oil are endless, so you can use the oil you’ve made in a variety of ways.

With this recipe, we recommend you start with CBD isolate or concentrate. The purest CBD isolate usually comes in the form of crystals. If you’re having a hard time finding CBD crystals, we’ve made some recommendations for our favorite CBD crystals and concentrates. Check out that list here.

We’ve highlighted the benefits of making your own CBD oil, but the DIY route isn’t for everybody. Some downsides come with taking this process into your own hands, including missing out on professional oil extraction, fewer flavor and taste options, and a steep learning curve for first-timers.

Using CBD oil topically

If you do a quick search, you’ll probably find hundreds of CBD oil recipes, each one as complicated as the next. If it’s your first time making CBD oil, it’s best to take a simple approach and gain a foundational knowledge of the process before you get fancy with the type of oil you make. Our CBD oil recipe is about as simple as it gets.

The last thing you’ll need is a large pot and a stove or burner.

That’s it! If you follow the recipe, your final product will be 48 teaspoons of homemade CBD Oil at 20mg of CBD per serving. Of course, you can adjust the recipe to make higher or lower quantities. You can also add more isolate or crystals if you want to make a high-CBD blend.

If you live in a state where growing is legal, you might have already gotten your hands on some marijuana seeds, and are planning your first grow. While this is a great way to take the entire process into your own hands, you don’t have to grow your own marijuana to make CBD oil.

In order to achieve optimal CBD content, decarboxylation is a critical step prior to distillation. The process of decarboxylation is to remove carboxylic acid and CO2 from cannabinoids present in the cannabis extract. Converting the acidic cannabinoid (CBDa) to its neutral form (CBD) ensures the end product contains all of the several benefits the cannabinoid has to offer. Furthermore, failure to remove CO2 from the extract will also affect the ability to properly form a vacuum in your distillation apparatus. The decarboxylation process is achieved through the application of heat in a reactionary vessel.

While under vacuum, the extract is loaded into the feed tank where it passes over a heated rotating plate. From there, the heated oil then enters a secondary vessel where there are spinning wipers and a thin film is created around the heated, jacketed vessel. A long condensing coil in the middle of the vessel, cooled with recirculating fluid, recondenses the vapors back into liquid form. Receiving vessels then collect the CBD (known as ‘main body’) from the terpenes, volatiles and high boiling point cannabinoids (known as ‘heads’ and ‘tails’).

Once winterization has been completed it is necessary to now quickly filter those fats and waxes we coagulated from the miscella. A filter press is used with the assistance of a vacuum pump to pull the miscella mixture through a series of filter plates. Fats, waxes, etc are collected in one vessel and the desired miscella in another.

Step 3: Filtration

To make any concentrate you first have to extract. Manufacturers can use either a hydrocarbon solvent, like butane or propane, or ethanol solvent. Typically, we see ethanol used for the production of CBD isolate often with the use of a larger commercial extraction system – like a centrifuge. Smaller extraction systems can be used, it just depends on your throughput goals.

CBD isolate is 99% pure CBD, often in the form of a white powder that can be mixed into drinks or taken sublingually. This option is often popular among people who are just beginning to explore the use of cannabis or hemp derived products or looking to avoid the euphoric high associated with THC. It is also a great option for people who want hyper-accurate doses of CBD and the flexibility to create their own customized mixtures in their preferred carrier oil or liquid.

An additional option that some manufacturers complete to change the structure of the CBD isolate is to subject it to a crystallization process. This process results in a final product that is still 99.9% CBD but has a crystalline structure.

Depending on what end product you’re trying to make you may prefer to use a CBD isolate powder when manufacturing lotions, edibles, beverages, etc. In order to make a powder you are simply taking the CBD isolate crystals and grinding them down into a powder-like substance.

Terpenes are the compounds that give a plant its scent and occasionally flavor. There are many different terpenes, and each possesses unique benefits of their own. Terpenes are known for their potency, so even small amounts have a lasting impact when pairing with a cannabinoid like CBD.

• Carrier Oil of Choice (Link to Top 7 carrier oil blog – this is one of our stronger posts in terms of rankings)

Learning how to make your own CBD oil is great, but there is one catch to making CBD oil from isolate: it can’t be full spectrum.

CBD Isolate vs Full Spectrum CBD

CBD, as a pure isolate powder, is an excellent option for anyone seeking a strictly CBD-only product. Full spectrum CBD products contain trace amounts of THC and other cannabinoids, so isolates provide a safe alternative for a CBD user.

CBD is so popular as a pure isolate because isolates have a much broader range of use, including the ability to make CBD oil from isolate. Making your own CBD Oil is easier than you’d expect, and with a pure isolate, you are already halfway there.

You can add other ingredients too! When it comes to isolates, the possibilities are truly limitless, because you don’t have to stop at just CBD. From carrier oils to other plants and even other cannabinoids! CBN and CBG are available as pure isolates too!

Isolating one compound from a plant and extracting it purely is a complicated process that takes time. For the sake of clarity, we’ve boiled the process down to five critical steps to make a CBD isolate product.