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how many milligrams of cbd should salves have

A 2019 comprehensive review published in The Lancet Psychiatry looked at previously published studies.   The review ultimately concluded that there was little evidence to support the use of CBD for mental health purposes and suggested that more research is needed in order to substantiate its use to treat symptoms of conditions such as anxiety, depression, and insomnia.

There have been a number of studies that suggest that CBD may have a number of different physical and mental health uses. However, more research is still needed to better understand the substance’s potential applications and possible long-term side effects.

How Much Should You Take?

In studies, amounts vary from as low as 20 milligrams per day to up to 1,500 milligrams (mg) per day. The World Health Organization reports that dosages in clinical research studies typically range between 100 and 800 milligrams per day.  

Cannabidiol (CBD) is the second most abundant cannabinoid found in marijuana. Unlike tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), CBD does not have psychoactive effects. Interest in the use of CBD for health purposes has grown tremendously in the last few years.

In addition to the mental health benefits, CBD may also have therapeutic benefits for a range of other conditions. The World Health Organization suggests that CBD may have beneficial effects in the treatment of:  

But first, what is CBD used for?

Most experts recommend starting “slow and small” because your weight, genetics, diet, and health conditions all play a role in how CBD can affect your body. You may notice a positive difference by taking 5 mg per day. Or you may not feel anything until reaching 50 mg per day. That’s why it’s best to start with a micro-dose and work your way up.

Disclaimer: CBD is only FDA-approved as a treatment for epilepsy. There is no clinical proof that CBD has additional curative value. This article does not recommend CBD as a replacement for any medication you are currently taking. Before adding CBD to your diet, consider talking to your doctor.

CBD dosing for seizures

We need more human clinical trials to shine a light on precise CBD dosing requirements and medicinal uses. Until then, you are your own best advocate. Remember:

Ask your rheumatologist or primary care provider to recommend an expert, or find an expert near you by searching the directory of members of the Society of Cannabis Clinicians or the database maintained by your state’s medical marijuana program (if it has one).

Here are some tips to guide you on how to find the right CBD dosage for your pain relief and other symptoms.

2. Do some math

There are very few human studies on CBD, and those that have been done include doses that are all over the map: In some studies, patients used 5 mg of CBD; in others, they took as much as 600 mg. To further add to the confusion, CBD comes in a number of forms — oils and tinctures, creams and lotions, pills, vaping, and edibles — and each one has differences in terms of bioavailability (the percent of active ingredient that gets into your bloodstream).

When it comes to CBD in topical form (creams, lotions, and salves), you’ll probably see the total amount of CBD in the container listed on the label. You’ll then have to divide that total by the number of millimeters in the package to determine how much is in each milliliter. For example, if you have a 50 ml jar of salve that contains 200 mg of CBD, there’s 4 mg per ml. You should then use a metric measuring spoon to scoop out 7.5 ml to get a 30 mg dose of CBD.

“There are no standard doses for patients,” says Rachna Patel, DO, a physician who does consultations about medical marijuana and CBD and sells her own line of CBD products. “Ultimately, it’s trial and error, but you have to go about it in a methodical way.”