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copaiba oil vs cbd

There are three groups of molecules that can greatly affect the function of the ECS: endocannabinoids (produced by the body), phytocannabinoids (produced by plants), and synthetic cannabinoids (produced in a lab). Phytocannabinoids are different because they are produced naturally by plants, such as Cannabis, Black Truffle, and Cacao, and found within essential oils such as Copaiba, Black Pepper, and Melissa.

Within the ECS, there are two primary receptors, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2). The brain and spinal cord contain CB1 receptors, whereas CB2 receptors are predominately found in our immune system. Due to residing in different parts of the body, activation of these receptors can have very different effects. For instance CB2 activation supports healthy nervous and immune system function, while activating its counterpart (CB1) receptors can modulate mood, memory, or even perception of pain. While binding to the CB1 receptors positively influences many brain functions, research has shown that it may also have some unwanted psychoactive effects 1 .

CB1 and CB2 Receptors

Exemplifying doTERRA’s commitment to Pursue What’s Pure, Copaiba is a product born from that standard. Unlike CBD, essential oils rich in BCP, such as Copaiba, are easily tolerated compounds that offer countless benefits to the human body. At this year’s convention, Scott highlighted other possible targets and pathways for BCP outside the ECS such as the CD14 receptor, the μ-Opioid receptor, and the α7-nACHRs receptor.* These receptors affect pathways associated with healthy inflammatory response 3 , overall body comfort, and cognitive function.

Using natural plant products in traditional health has been a practice for centuries. Mother Nature has provided some of the most diverse, complex compounds still used today to promote wellness and address a variety of concerns. When presented with so many essential oil options, you might pose the common question: What’s the difference? How do you compare Lemon and Lime? Lavender and Clary Sage? Cassia and Cinnamon Bark? Or, in this case, CBD and Copaiba?

Because CBD does not bind directly to receptors, you can expect slower cellular responses. Scott Johnson said it best at convention describing CBD as a “helper molecule that signals the ECS to work more efficiently and modulate our responses to the molecules that do directly bind to our receptors.” Furthermore, as doTERRA’s in-house GCMS testing has shown, CBD—which is an isolate extracted from the cannabis plant—is often mixed with carrier oils, so absorption is limited and the effect is further decreased. In fact, a recent review of clinical data on CBD revealed internal usage may come with potential unwanted risks 4 .

Copaiba Essential Oil

That becomes an issue of several factors including the amount that’s present. One of the things that’s unique about this as an isolated compound is that we generally don’t see it in very high amounts. Very minimal amounts in terms of the dosage and that may not be substantial enough to create the benefits that we look for consistently. And so it’s this shortened activation or a cascade of activation that has to take place, and then we have some question about dosage.

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Indirect Receptor Stimulation

But what we know right now is even if CBD didn’t have any of those obstacles by comparison Copaiba essential oil is different. It is an essential oil. Here we have four species of Copaiba blended together the chemistry and the construct of that is completely different including that’s primarily sesquiterpene. And one of the great values of sesquiterpenes, and of course you know I’m going to talk about chemistry; I have to do that. One of the great things about sesquiterpenes is that we have the potential for many downstream effects and benefits. In other words secondary metabolites and even tertiary metabolites longer lasting effects and benefits.

And there are more than a thousand published studies that are talking directly about Copaiba and its influence within human physiology and some of the activity that way.

At Nature’s Ultra, we love Young Living’s copaiba essential oil and have included it in past products, with plans to infuse our future products with it, as well.

As if there wasn’t enough to learn from the explosion of CBD oil products as more CBD benefits are uncovered, consumers also need to avoid confusion when it comes to copaiba vs CBD. If you’ve never heard of copaiba, when you opt to use CBD oil, chances are you will encounter copaiba sooner than later.

In order to access this support, Nature’s Ultra has developed products depending on personal need and preference, including CBD oil infused with essential oils like cinnamon , mint , and citrus , as well as soothing CBD Joint & Muscle Balm and calming CBD Roll-On .

Defining the Differences Between Copaiba vs CBD

Right or wrong, these two products are often presented as one and the same. The first thing to be aware of is that, despite some similarities, copaiba and CBD oil are absolutely not the same.

Whichever alternative or essential oil product you’re considering, it’s critical that quality assurance is in place.

That’s why, “At Nature’s Ultra, we pride ourselves on creating potent, pure, effective, and safe CBD products . We test during every single step of the process to ensure that our products are as high-quality as possible.”

In order to appreciate the differences between copaiba vs CBD, we need to delve a bit deeper into the nitty-gritty. In other words, get ready to be blinded by science. (Not really, this stuff is pretty simple).