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cbd pain releif cream drug interactions

Some medications changed by the liver include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), ibuprofen (Motrin), meloxicam (Mobic), piroxicam (Feldene), and celecoxib (Celebrex); amitriptyline (Elavil); warfarin (Coumadin); glipizide (Glucotrol); losartan (Cozaar); and others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

The passage of the 2018 Farm Bill made it legal to sell hemp and hemp products in the U.S. But that doesn’t mean that all hemp-derived cannabidiol products are legal. Since cannabidiol has been studied as a new drug, it can’t be legally included in foods or dietary supplements. Also, cannabidiol can’t be included in products marketed with therapeutic claims. Cannabidiol can only be included in “cosmetic” products and only if it contains less than 0.3% THC. But there are still products labeled as dietary supplements on the market that contain cannabidiol. The amount of cannabidiol contained in these products is not always reported accurately on the product label.

Cannabidiol is most commonly used for seizure disorder (epilepsy). It is also used for anxiety, pain, a muscle disorder called dystonia, Parkinson disease, Crohn disease, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

Special precautions & warnings:

Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Brivaracetam (Briviact) Brivaracetam is changed and broken down by the body. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the body breaks down brivaracetam. This might increase levels of brivaracetam in the body. Carbamazepine (Tegretol) Carbamazepine is changed and broken down by the body. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the body breaks down carbamazepine. This might increase levels of carbamazepine in the body and increase its side effects. Clobazam (Onfi) Clobazam is changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down clobazam. This might increase the effects and side effects of clobazam. Eslicarbazepine (Aptiom) Eslicarbazepine is changed and broken down by the body. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the body breaks down eslicarbazepine. This might increase levels of eslicarbazepine in the body by a small amount. Everolimus (Zostress) Everolimus is changed and broken down by the body. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the body breaks down everolimus. This might increase levels of everolimus in the body. Lithium Taking higher doses of cannabidiol might increase levels of lithium. This can increase the risk of lithium toxicity. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications changed by the liver include nicotine, chlormethiazole (Heminevrin), coumarin, methoxyflurane (Penthrox), halothane (Fluothane), valproic acid (Depacon), disulfiram (Antabuse), and others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

The effectiveness ratings for CANNABIDIOL (CBD) are as follows:

Some medications changed by the liver include alprazolam (Xanax), amlodipine (Norvasc), clarithromycin (Biaxin), cyclosporine (Sandimmune), erythromycin, lovastatin (Mevacor), ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), fexofenadine (Allegra), triazolam (Halcion), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin) and many others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

CBD has the potential to interact with many other products, including over-the-counter medications, herbal products, and prescription medications. Some medications should never be taken with CBD; the use of other medications may need to be modified or reduced to prevent serious issues. The consequences of drug interactions also depend on many other factors, including the dose of CBD, the dose of another medication, and a person’s underlying health condition. Older adults are more susceptible to drug interactions because they often take multiple medications, and because of age-related physiological changes that affect how our bodies process medications.

Products containing cannabidiol (CBD) seem to be all the rage these days, promising relief from a wide range of maladies, from insomnia and hot flashes to chronic pain and seizures. Some of these claims have merit to them, while some of them are just hype. But it won’t hurt to try, right? Well, not so fast. CBD is a biologically active compound, and as such, it may also have unintended consequences. These include known side effects of CBD, but also unintended interactions with supplements, herbal products, and over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medications.

While generally considered safe, CBD may cause drowsiness, lightheadedness, nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, and, in rare instances, damage to the liver. Taking CBD with other medications that have similar side effects may increase the risk of unwanted symptoms or toxicity. In other words, taking CBD at the same time with OTC or prescription medications and substances that cause sleepiness, such as opioids, benzodiazepines (such as Xanax or Ativan), antipsychotics, antidepressants, antihistamines (such as Benadryl), or alcohol may lead to increased sleepiness, fatigue, and possibly accidental falls and accidents when driving. Increased sedation and tiredness may also happen when using certain herbal supplements, such as kava, melatonin, and St. John’s wort. Taking CBD with stimulants (such as Adderall) may lead to decreased appetite, while taking it with the diabetes drug metformin or certain heartburn drugs (such as Prilosec) may increase the risk of diarrhea.

The bottom line: Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if using or considering CBD

The researchers further warned that while the list may be used as a starting point to identify potential drug interactions with marijuana or CBD oil, plant-derived cannabinoid products may deliver highly variable cannabinoid concentrations (unlike the FDA-regulated prescription cannabinoid medications previously mentioned), and may contain many other compounds that can increase the risk of unintended drug interactions.

Absolutely. Inhaled CBD gets into the blood the fastest, reaching high concentration within 30 minutes and increasing the risk of acute side effects. Edibles require longer time to absorb and are less likely to produce a high concentration peak, although they may eventually reach high enough levels to cause an issue or interact with other medications. Topical formulations, such as creams and lotions, may not absorb and get into the blood in sufficient amount to interact with other medications, although there is very little information on how much of CBD gets into the blood eventually. All of this is further complicated by the fact that none of these products are regulated or checked for purity, concentration, or safety.

Many drugs are broken down by enzymes in the liver, and CBD may compete for or interfere with these enzymes, leading to too much or not enough of the drug in the body, called altered concentration. The altered concentration, in turn, may lead to the medication not working, or an increased risk of side effects. Such drug interactions are usually hard to predict but can cause unpleasant and sometimes serious problems.

People considering or taking CBD products should always mention their use to their doctor, particularly if they are taking other medications or have underlying medical conditions, such as liver disease, kidney disease, epilepsy, heart issues, a weakened immune system, or are on medications that can weaken the immune system (such as cancer medications). A pharmacist is a great resource to help you learn about a potential interaction with a supplement, an herbal product (many of which have their own drug interactions), or an over-the-counter or prescription medication. Don’t assume that just because something is natural, it is safe and trying it won’t hurt. It very well might.

CBD is has become increasingly popular in recent years due to its wide range of therapeutic effects as well as its ability to relieve a host of symptoms effectively , but also to do so safely and with few side effects. And unlike tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the other most abundant phytocannabinoid found in the cannabis plant, CBD is non-intoxicating and non-psychoactive – something that for many people is an undesirable yet unavoidable part of taking a high-THC containing cannabis extract.

Explained very simplistically, when food is eaten, it is broken down by the liver into its individual compounds in order for it to be used by the body. So, for example, carbohydrates are broken down into sugars, fats into triglycerides, and proteins into amino acids. From there, the metabolism, under the control of chemicals called enzymes, transforms these compounds into metabolites that can then be used by the body, for instance as fuel for cellular processes or as building blocks for various systems and tissues.

Understanding Metabolism

There are also other medications known as “prodrugs” that first need to be metabolized into its therapeutic compounds as opposed to being a therapeutic compound in and of itself (like most medications). In other words, the inactive compound is ingested, and once in the body, it is processed into its active compound.

However, this basal metabolic rate is very different to metabolism – the way in which substances such as different types of food are broken down and used by the body – with much of this process happening in the gut and the liver in what is known as the ‘first-pass effect,’ or ‘first-pass metabolism’.

Similarly, a study investigating the potential ADEs and DDIs the researchers highlighted that medical CBD users under clinical supervision should be screened for potential DDIs and ADEs between CBD, other pharmacotherapies, and their underlying conditions. They also recommended that an increase in awareness is needed among the lay public who are recreational or consumer CBD users. Similarly, healthcare providers should also be made aware of the potential for DDIs and ADEs with CBD and strategically prescribe and manage patient regimens while also considering patient desires for complementary or alternative therapies.