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cbd oil texas

CBD is a rapidly growing market but it lacks regulation in terms of manufacturing standards and labeling. There are many brands selling high-quality products, but there’s no shortage of suppliers that don’t care much about what’s inside their products.

CBD has become one of the most wanted products in the world of wellness. It has an array of documented health benefits and people take it to alleviate a wide range of physical and mental health problems, such as anxiety, inflammation, pain, and neurological issues to name a few.

Hemp contains only trace amounts of THC (up to 0.3%) and higher ratios of CBD. The chemical makeup of hemp makes it unable to get the user intoxicated.

Is CBD Oil Legal in Texas?

As you can see, the Texas CBD laws are complicated. Although the state doesn’t permit marijuana for recreational use — and has a very limited medical marijuana program — hemp-derived CBD is legal and you can easily find such products over the counter and online. Always make sure that your product has a Certificate of Analysis from a third-party laboratory to confirm its CBD content in case you got caught by the police.

Let’s make sure you understand its legal status.

As you can see, there aren’t many options when it comes to marijuana-derived CBD in Texas.

The easiest way to purchase high-quality CBD oil in Texas is through a reputable online store. Online retailers can offer better deals on CBD products than most local stores in Texas.

“Unless you really know that it’s something reputable, I would say to be wary because you don’t really know that it is even CBD,” Kerver said.

In 2018, the federal government passed a new Farm Bill legalizing hemp and derivatives, like CBD, with less than 0.3% of THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol. Hemp and marijuana are both part of the cannabis plant family, but while marijuana is rich in THC and produces a high, hemp contains only traces of the psychoactive compounds and is richer in CBD.

Booming business

Much of the sudden spike in popularity is thanks to a Texas law last year that legalized hemp, the plant from which CBD is derived.

Today, the market for CBD, or cannabidiol, is exploding. Stores are popping up across the state selling tinctures and topicals. It’s being mixed into smoothies and coffee at cafes. Spas are advertising CBD massages and therapies. And much of the sudden spike in popularity is thanks to a Texas law last year that legalized hemp, the plant from which CBD is derived.

“You go anywhere now, and you find something that says ‘CBD’ on it,” said Kerver, who’s now in talks with Austin distributors interested in carrying her CBD product line, called 1937 Apothecary.

Hemp-derived CBD products can also be purchased through various online retailers.

Even though hemp strains don’t produce enough THC to cause intoxication, all types of cannabis, including hemp, were illegal under the 1970 Federal Controlled Substances Act. The legislation swept all cannabis into the Schedule I category, which defined cannabis as a substance with a high potential for abuse, no accepted medical use, and a likelihood for addiction.

The Farm Bill also preserved the power of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to regulate CBD’s labeling, therapeutic claims, and its use as a food additive. The FDA maintains that even hemp-derived CBD may not be added to food and beverages, nor marketed as dietary supplements. The FDA has begun a process of reevaluating its position on such CBD products, but it has yet to revise its rules or specifically regulate CBD products, leading to further confusion. The FDA has been strict when it comes to claims that could be construed as medical advice about CBD.

Texas CBD possession limits

Texas’ definition of consumable hemp products includes foods, drugs, devices or cosmetics that contain industrial hemp or hemp-derived cannabinoids, including CBD, with no more than 0.3% THC. The Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) is creating a registration process for retailers to sell consumable hemp products with CBD.

When the Texas Health and Human Services Commission adopts rules on the qualifying diseases, more incurable neurodegenerative disorders may be added to the list.

CBD stands for cannabidiol. It is a non-intoxicating cannabinoid found in cannabis. Cannabidiol is the second-most abundant cannabinoid in the plant after tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). It has many potential therapeutic benefits, including anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-anxiety, and seizure-suppressant properties. CBD can be sourced from both marijuana and hemp plants.

Full-spectrum means that the CBD has been extracted from a hemp plant along with all other cannabinoids and terpenes, including whatever trace amounts of THC the plant may have produced. Consuming full-spectrum CBD may yield better results thanks to the entourage effect, a phenomenon in which the mixture of cannabinoids and terpenes work together to produce a more pleasant experience.