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cbd oil oregon

(Courtesy of Coalition Brewing Co.)

If you’d prefer your CBD-infused beverage to be less “let’s grab a beer” and more “let’s grab a water,” give the Lemon Sparkling Water from Bend-based Ablis a shot.

(Courtesy of Serra)

“Two Flowers” CBD-Infused IPA by Coalition Brewing

Beer and cannabis. Does it get any better? Well, it does if you can have both at the same time.

There are moments when getting high is just what the doctor ordered—and in those cases, there’s plenty of flower, extracts, and edibles with a little THC (or, let’s be real… a lot) that will do the trick.

Check these menus for it:

If you want your CBD packaged in some of the best chocolate you’ll ever taste, check out the Relief Square from Serra and Woodblock Chocolate. These dark chocolate and sea salt chocolate bars are made from a micro-lot of cacao beans from Trinidad—meaning that the only place you’ll be able to taste this chocolate (which has flavors of fig, marshmallow, raspberry, and pepper) is in this bar. Each bar contains nine 5mg-servings of CBD—just make sure to pace yourself, as they also contain THC (2.5mg per serving).

Purchase private label Broad-Spectrum CBD Oil / Hemp from Palm Organix at great prices in Oregon to offer your customers the best CBD / Hemp Oil products available in the USA.

Are you ready to launch your own CBD brand in Oregon? Have the CDB experts at Palm Organix supply you with high quality CBD Gummies, CBD Tinctures, CBD Softgels / Capsules and CBD Topicals / Skincare as well as CBD oil for Dogs all with your private label representing your CBD oil brand. (Energy Drink packets are not available for White Label orders)

Thank you for shopping at Palm Organix’s CBD Oil online store. We value our customers and will provide free shipping on your Hemp orders in Oregon.

Become a Palm Organix™ CBD Wholesaler in Oregon!

Here’s what you need to know as you begin your journey to buy CBD Oil in Oregon:

The residents of Oregon tend to be passionate about the outdoors and enjoy the many vast green areas, lakes and especially the parks that Oregon has to offer. Oregon is well known for Crater Lake National Park which is home to Crater Lake, the deepest Lake in the United States. Other notable parks in Oregon include, Valley of The Rogue River State Park, Ecola State Park and Smith Rock State Park to name a few. If you have not visited Oregon, and its many beautiful parks, this trip should be high on your list.

If you live in Oregon and are interested in beginning your own personal CBD oil journey towards greater health and wellness, Palm Organix™ is excited to tell you all about what pure Hemp/CBD oil has to offer in Oregon. Whether you live in Portland, Salem, Eugene, Gresham, Hillsboro, Beavertown, Bend Medford, Springfield, Corvallis or any of the other terrific cities in Oregon, Palm Organix™ has your CBD needs covered.

You are likely saying to yourself that Hemp/CBD sounds like a terrific option, but you are also probably asking yourself, is CBD Oil Legal in Oregon?; or Can I buy pure CBD in Oregon? The answer is yes to both! However, the pure CBD oil you purchase must comply with the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018, also more commonly referred to as The Farm Bill Act of 2018.

As one of the most cannabis-friendly states in the nation, the Oregon cannabis rules for CBD are equally progressive. But as CBD — and the production of products including CBD oil — has become more widespread, states are putting stricter regulations on CBD.

Currently, Oregon is theWest Coast state where CBD in food and beverages can be purchased from retailers, including pharmacies and grocery stores.

What is CBD?

CBD stands for cannabidiol, a cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant. Unlike THC, CBD is non-intoxicating — so consumption of CBD won’t produce the same “high” as flower, edibles, or other cannabis products containing THC.

There are no restrictions on the sale of CBD products to individuals 21 and older, except for inhalant delivery systems and their components.

Hemp strains don’t produce enough THC to cause intoxication, yet all cannabis — including hemp — was considered illegal under the 1970 Federal Controlled Substances Act. Under this law, cannabis was categorized as a Schedule 1 drug, defined as a substance with a high abuse potential, no accepted medical use, and a likelihood for addiction.