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cbd isolate vs oil

People who use CBD isolate find it particularly beneficial for its calming properties and therapeutic potential. We already know that it works with our body’s endocannabinoid system to activate receptors in the brain and help restore homeostasis – the natural balance of the body – which includes our mood, body temperature, water content and more. But it’s also associated with other long-term health effects: multiple studies have shown that CBD could have anti-inflammatory properties, relieve chronic pain, help with muscle repair and help promote a good night’s sleep.

Since CBD isolate is pure, there’s no need to worry about any THC entering your system after consumption and you won’t fail a workplace drug test. It’s totally legal and has zero high-inducing effects, so you’ll be able to go about your day as normal – just a little bit more relaxed.

CBD Isolate: The Drawbacks

You’ve added the good stuff to your cart, now what? When it comes to taking CBD oil, you have the freedom to be as inventive as you like.

If you’ve done your research and understand the effects that full-spectrum CBD oil can have in comparison to CBD isolate, you might decide it’s a good option for you.

This one-man band stands out from the crowd for having what seems to be the widest therapeutic value. CBD isolate has been stripped of all other active ingredients and cannabinoids – what remains is a pure CBD molecule. Think of it as peeling a fruit and only eating the inside bit. But don’t be fooled by the word ‘isolate’: there’s a whole host of health and wellness benefits to CBD isolate products.

The increased popularity of CBD has led many users to raise questions about the methods of extracting and administering CBD. The main question is which form provides the most effective range of medical benefits for the user. The two most common forms of extracted CBD found in stores are full-spectrum (whole-plant extract) and pure CBD isolate. Most users prefer the full-spectrum option. As CBD’s usefulness for medical purposes has become more accepted over the years, new methods of administering it have continued to evolve.

This has left some users concerned not just with which form of extracted CBD is most effective or what the proper dosage for them may be, but also with which method of supplementation gives the user the most relief in the right amount of time. Some of the most common methods include applying it sublingually, topically, or taking it in capsules. Vaping cbd is regarded by many to be the most bio-available way to administer, and as such, this has led to an increase in the demand for CBD isolate. This form of CBD is different from full-spectrum CBD extract in that it only contains CBD and none of the other cannabinoids, terpenes, or healthy fatty acids that commonly result from the whole-plant extraction process.

Cannabis, with its complex chemical structure, contains over 100 active cannabinoids aside from CBD. It also contains terpenes, which have anti-inflammatory properties, and are regarded as increasing the efficacy of cannabinoids. Although they are not rated as important as CBD when it comes medical benefits, some of these other cannabinoids have been found to have symptom alleviating qualities as well. The cannabinoids CBN and CBG for example, are found in most full-spectrum extracts and studies have shown that both contain anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and pain relieving properties.

THC is one of the cannabinoids involved in the “entourage effect” stated earlier so it is ideal for inclusion in CBD supplementation. A recent article on full-spectrum CBD demonstrates the importance of THC inclusion by stating, “In hemp THC is a minor constituent and appears only in trace amounts under 0.3% by dry weight, as required by the U.S. government for hemp products. THC mimics the action of anandamide, a neurotransmitter naturally produced in the human body, and binds to CB1 receptors in the endocannabinoid system found mostly in the brain. The extremely low levels of THC in hemp make hemp oil non-psychoactive and safe for all ages to use.”

The public profile of CBD has soared in recent years, with users using it to treat all manner of ailments and conditions. It can be consumed in a variety of ways, ranging from simple oral consumption to topical use and even vaping. There are two main forms of CBD on the market. These are ‘full spectrum’ CBD and CBD isolate. There are a number of key differences between the two, which we will look at in this article. We will also look at methods of consumption, as this can have dramatic impact on the efficacy of CBD. As we will see, full-spectrum CBD is more popular, and for good reason, but isolate has certain benefits that might appeal to different CBD users.

CBD isolate is the purest form of CBD. It may be a suitable product for first-time CBD users who wish to experiment with the potential health benefits, without the interference of other cannabis compounds, which may alter the effects. CBD isolate is also refined, so it has no discernible taste or odor.

One 2018 study found that certain CBD compounds may also have neuroprotective effects.

The CBD extraction process is no different for each of these products, which usually involves:

The difference between CBD isolate and full-spectrum CBD relates to the contents of each form.

CBD isolate is a pure form of CBD. It contains no other cannabis plant compounds. It usually comes from hemp plants, which typically contain very low amounts of THC. CBD isolate is a crystal form of CBD, and it is often ground up and sold as a powder. It may also be called CBD crystals.

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People use CBD for a variety of health reasons, such as pain and anxiety. While more research could clarify their anecdotally reported benefits, some evidence suggests that CBD products can help with certain conditions.