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cbd isolate and thc tolerance

Studies [3] seem to suggest [4] that CBD is not tolerance-forming, and may in fact have reverse-tolerance effects; in other words, taking CBD regularly may result in users needing less of the cannabinoid to achieve the same results. It would seem CB1 cells don’t resist negative allosteric modulation in the same way they resist direct intense stimulation. Further, given CBD’s specific relationship to CB1 receptors, it likely helps modulate the tolerance-forming pattern of THC. Pot smokers concerned about tolerance would be wise to add some CBD to their cannabinoid diet.

As pot smokers will attest, regular use of THC builds tolerance—seasoned smokers will find themselves consuming many times as much as new users. Further, tolerance develops unevenly and also varies depending on individual physiology. As such, the full experience of getting high will be different the more one smokes. Many regular users take “T-breaks” or switch strains to recharge their tolerance after heavy use.

To answer these questions, we’ll begin with a brief overview of tolerance formation.

CBD AND YOUR ENDOCANNABINOID SYSTEM

THC tolerance happens mainly through the cells. THC works by binding with CB1 receptors in the brain. When this happens repeatedly, the cells try to reverse the effect and maintain normal CB1 activity. They accomplish this through two main methods: the first is called desensitisation, where CB1 receptors start binding to cannabinoids less easily. The second method is called internalisation, and it’s the process by which CB1 receptors are pulled from the surface of the cell into its interior; unlike desensitised receptors, which can still be activated by THC, albeit to a lesser degree, internalised cells become entirely unresponsive.

We all know that taking too much THC produces tolerance—but can the same be said for CBD? CBD has a wide range of medical applications, and it’s important to know whether these become less effective over time. To find out, we’ll dive into the effects of CBD on CB1 receptors, and examine the research in question.

CBD, however, is a different beast. Unlike THC, it doesn’t get you high, but can encourage a relaxed feeling. CBD is responsible for many of the health benefits associated with cannabis. It also has different effects on your endocannabinoid system, and a very different tolerance profile to THC.

These days, CBD is more and more being seen as a wonder drug, and has shown effectiveness at treating epilepsy, alleviating anxiety, improving symptoms of arthritis, and reducing the risk of diabetes [1] . Whether you take it in a tincture, smoke it in flower form, or swallow it in pills, CBD is a wonderful addition to any health-conscious person’s repertoire. But is there such thing as too much CBD? Can ingesting this cannabinoid too often build tolerance to its positive effects?

It is easy to surprise yourself in reading about cannabidiols’ potential benefits, especially regarding its ability to avoid the development of tolerance. It turns out that developing tolerance to CBD is a very different process than developing a tolerance for THC, and it’s nearly polar opposite. Instead of developing a chemical tolerance, CBD users experience what’s known as a reverse tolerance. In the case of reverse tolerance, continued use of CBD actually results in a smaller and smaller dose being needed to achieve the same effects as time progresses. As previously mentioned, compounds found in cannabis and hemp plants work closely with the endocannabinoid system by attaching themselves to endocannabinoid receptors. While THC diminishes the effectiveness of these receptors with repeated use, and over a long period of time, CBD promotes increased activity in these receptor cells. More specifically, this means that CBD users don’t face a breakdown of the interaction that cannabidiol has within the endocannabinoid system, so it can stay continually active without diminishing its own effectiveness.

Many CBD users have reported using lower doses as time goes on because lower doses were ultimately needed to achieve the desired effects. Considering this, CBD may prove to be a benefit for anyone interested in using it in their daily lives.

As people have begun looking to cannabidiol (CBD) for its potential benefits, questions have inevitably arisen regarding the implications of introducing a new chemical into your system. Whether you’re using full spectrum CBD oil or isolate CBD, these extracts come from plants and so many consumers may be concerned with what this all means regarding any addictive qualities.

The good news is that the source of a chemical usually doesn’t matter much regarding this property, it all comes down to how the chemical interacts in the body. Cannabis and hemp products, including CBD, interact directly with the endocannabinoid system. Regular cannabis users may be familiar with the compound THC, a psychoactive composite that is predominantly present in the cannabis plant. CBD, however, is the second most potent compound in the plant and the most prevalent chemical in the hemp plant. While THC users may be familiar with the body’s ability to develop a tolerance to the psychoactive nature of this compound, it’s reasonable to wonder if CBD can have a similar effect. Considering both THC and CBD are so closely related, it is easy to assume that they work in similar fashions. In reality, these chemicals work very differently from one another, and an inability to develop tolerance may be another potential reason to consider CBD as a new healthy additive to your lifestyle.

As is the case with most factors related to CBD, further research needs to be done. The growth and development of the industry should prove fruitful for this sort of vital information as companies, and other entities, are able to engage in more research to support these claims. That being said, as is recommended with any new supplemental diet changes, it is advised that you take precautions when approaching your schedule of CBD usage. Additionally, while your CBD dosage may fluctuate over time, it may interact with other medications that you are using to treat certain ailments. Proceed with caution and always consult a physicianl with questions about your own health. Stay soothe!

Reverse Tolerance

One method of dealing with THC tolerance is to reset the body. Giving the body a break from THC is a way to discontinue the cycle of tolerance. By stopping the use, mixing up strain types, and changing up the routine, THC tolerance can be reset. As little as two to three days of THC abstinence can work to flush the system, though a longer period of separation will produce the best results.

A key reason that tolerance develops is that the receptors in our body involved with substances decrease and their ability to bind efficiently weathers with repeated use. Similarly, other organs like the liver, which helps to metabolize substances, work harder each time certain substances are consumed. This kind of tolerance takes place at the metabolic level, and results in less of the substance reaching the site it is meant to effect.

Substances that deal with tolerance can vary; humans are known to need increased amounts of alcohol, prescription medication, and other drugs in order for their body to perform the desired effect. Certain kinds of cannabis (THC-dominant, as we now know), also play by these rules.

Tolerance

One key difference between the two is that consumers and patients can slowly build a tolerance to THC products after regular, everyday use. CBD, on the other hand, does not seem to have this effect.

For further evidence, CBD has been researched. A study found that CBD did not have the same desensitizing effects as THC with long-term consumption since CBD doesn’t bind with cannabinoid receptors.

These consumers, however, are not building immunity to the plant as a whole. Rather, their reaction comes from THC, a cannabinoid within the plant.

Tolerance – different from dependence – happens on several different levels. It essentially means that the body has a reduced reaction to a substance after repeated use.