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cbd cream pregnant

There are many potential negative health effects from using marijuana and other products containing THC during pregnancy and while breastfeeding. In fact, the U.S. Surgeon General recently advised consumers that marijuana use during pregnancy may affect fetal brain development, because THC can enter the fetal brain from the mother’s bloodstream. The Surgeon General also advised that marijuana may increase the risk of a newborn with low birth weight. Research also suggests increased risk for premature birth and potentially stillbirth 1 .

FDA recently completed an evaluation of some hemp seed-derived food ingredients and had no objections to the use of these ingredients in foods. THC and CBD are found mainly in hemp flowers, leaves, and stems, not in hemp seeds. Hemp seeds can pick up miniscule amounts of THC and CBD from contact with other plant parts, but these amounts are low enough to not raise concerns for any group, including pregnant or breastfeeding mothers.

What do we know about the effects of marijuana use during pregnancy and while breastfeeding?

FDA has not approved any CBD products except for one prescription drug to treat rare, severe forms of seizure disorders in children. It is still unclear whether CBD has any other benefits.

High doses of CBD in pregnant test animals have caused problems with the reproductive system of developing male fetuses 2 . In addition, based on what we already know about CBD, we expect that some amount of CBD will be transferred to babies through breast milk.

Additionally, marijuana smoke contains many of the same harmful components as tobacco smoke. Neither marijuana nor tobacco products should be smoked around a baby or children.

Still, little research is out there on CBD use during pregnancy. No conclusive evidence shows that taking CBD during pregnancy is or isn’t safe. So, it’s wise not to use CBD to soothe your ailments. It’s not proven how it impacts your body and developing fetus. No long-term research exists as to what happens years down the road after taking CBD during pregnancy.

But is CBD safe during pregnancy?
Some pregnant women have been curious about using CBD oils, lotions, creams or other topical products to alleviate pregnancy-related issues like moodiness, anxiety and muscle pain. These women theorize that applying CBD on top of your skin—instead of digesting it—means that it won’t end up in their bloodstream. In fact, in California, the number of pregnant women using cannabis almost doubled between 2009 and 2016, according to a study out of Kaiser Permanente Northern California, the only U.S. healthcare system that screens all pregnant women for prenatal marijuana use.

Yes, CBD isn’t THC. It’s much safer and has minor side effects like tiredness and diarrhea. Still, exactly how it works is unknown. It may even impact your hormones, which is something you don’t want to interfere with during pregnancy. Plus, CBD is a new and largely unregulated market. Products, even ones marketed as pure CBD, may be contaminated with pesticides, toxic metals and bacteria that you don’t want near your fetus.

Little research is out there on CBD use during pregnancy. We take a closer look.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that women who are pregnant or thinking about conceiving shouldn’t use marijuana or any of its by-products, including medical marijuana. THC, CBD’s cousin, may interfere with baby’s brain development and function and may be linked to stillbirth, lower birthweight and other unwanted outcomes. Even the lowest-dose products aren’t considered safe during pregnancy.

CBD is sold in various strengths and forms including oils, capsules, edibles and topicals at health food stores, smoke shops and pharmacies (if it’s legal in your state). You might dab CBD lotion on problematic areas or drizzle CBD oil into your coffee. Or maybe you munch on CBD edibles like chocolates or gummies.

It’s hard to turn on the TV or hop on social media without hearing mention of CBD. It’s on everyone’s minds lately. CBD—cannabidiol—is a chemical derived from cannabis. CBD is non-psychoactive and contains no tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC. So, it doesn’t produce the high associated with marijuana. Since this therapeutic agent is legal in some states, it’s enticing to those who want relief minus mind-altering effects.

Countless products containing CBD have popped up, touted as natural remedies for ailments ranging from joint pain and seizures to anxiety and insomnia. CBD is thought to alleviate conditions like inflammation, migraines, nausea and sleep disorders. And women are getting in on it, too, using it for issues like hormone regulation, beauty benefits, menopause and premenstrual syndrome symptom alleviation, and sex life enhancer.

CBD products aren’t well regulated. They can be contaminated with substances that aren’t safe for a fetus, including THC, pesticides, heavy metals, bacteria, and fungus.

CBD oil is extracted from cannabidiol (CBD), one of the active ingredients in the cannabis plant.

CBD may interact with other medications, such as blood thinners, and potentially cause serious side effects. Other possible side effects of using CBD include:

What is CBD oil used for?

Some methods of taking CBD:

The label on the CBD product you purchase may be incorrect. In one study, researchers tested 84 CBD products and found that 26 percent contained substantially less CBD than shown on the label, and 43 percent contained substantially more. THC was detected in 18 of the 84 samples.

In addition to using CBD to alleviate stress, anxiety, pain, and insomnia, some pregnant women take it to treat morning sickness. But there’s no proof that CBD is effective in treating these conditions, and there’s no consensus on what doses are appropriate.

Here’s why using CBD during pregnancy isn’t considered safe at this time: