Posted on

cbd added to alcohol tincture

Cannabis tinctures are usually taken by putting a few drops under your tongue (sublingually). When taken this way, the arterial blood supply under your tongue rapidly absorbs the THC. That being said, you can always swallow the tincture in a drink or food, but it will be absorbed slower by your liver.

Some people have reported experiencing a burning sensation under their tongue after a few drops of tincture—the high-proof alcohol used to make a tincture is responsible for this. If the tincture burns under your tongue and you are looking for a different option, you can get a glycerin-based tincture or incorporate your tincture into a beverage.

Tinctures are especially great for first-time cannabis consumers. Here are some reasons why:

How do I take my tincture?

It’s important to be consistent when making tinctures. If you make two batches at different strengths, a dose from each won’t be the same. Write down how much alcohol and cannabis you use for each batch so it can be replicated again if it was to your liking.

According to The Herbal Medicine-Maker’s Handbook, cannabis tinctures will last for many years when stored in a cool, dark place. Their long shelf life means you can make large quantities of them in one sitting.

Cannabis tinctures are alcohol-based cannabis extracts—essentially, cannabis-infused alcohol. In fact, tinctures were the main form of cannabis medicine until the United States enacted cannabis prohibition. They’re a great entry point for both recreational and medical consumers looking to ease into smokeless consumption methods.

I like to add some cannabis oil to my homemade chicken tikka masala for a delicious infused dinner.

Tip: High-proof alcohol is recommended because a higher alcohol content, or proof, more easily dissolves the cannabinoids. Do not mistake isopropyl alcohol for something that can be used here. Stick with food-grade alcohol like Everclear or other grain alcohol.

A cannabis tincture is a type of cannabis extract that is usually alcohol-based. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

Even though cannabis tinctures constitute an edible form of marijuana, they work much faster than traditional edibles like brownies or gummies. In fact, if taken correctly, the effects of cannabis tinctures can begin in a few seconds, as opposed to the typical hour or more of weed edibles. That’s because the sublingual tissue under the tongue allows the cannabinoids to pass directly into the bloodstream, instead of going through the digestive tract to reach the bloodstream.

Image lightbox

Following the steps above will yield a bottle of basic cannabis tincture. There are other tincture recipes you can experiment with, such as Master Wu’s Green Dragon.

To achieve the full effect, tinctures should be held under the tongue for 30 seconds, ideally while rubbing it into the tissue. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

A cannabis tincture is a type of cannabis extract that is usually alcohol-based. Tinctures have gained popularity among cannabis consumers since they are a smokeless consumption method and can be easily prepared at home.

The list of supplies and ingredients to make a cannabis tincture is very short. Here’s what you’ll need to make one in your kitchen:

In some cases, manufacturers will even label CBD oils as “CBD oil tincture”, causing understandable confusion when you’re trying to sort through the different products on the market. However, there are some key differences between CBD oil and true CBD tincture:

Quality commercial CBD tinctures offer convenience and high levels of purity. Oil-based tinctures that use a CO₂ extraction method are often extremely potent.

Homemade vs Store-Bought CBD Tinctures

Homemade CBD tinctures are made by soaking hemp or cannabis plant material in alcohol. The alcohol may or may not be heated to encourage extraction. Vinegar or vegetable glycerine can be used instead of alcohol. However, alcohol will give a more potent result.

So, how exactly do you make a CBD tincture at home? And how are homemade tinctures different from what you would buy commercially?

If the bitterness doesn’t bother you, you can take your tincture sublingually (under the tongue). Research suggests that substances taken sublingually are absorbed by the body faster [1] than other oral methods.