Posted on

can you melt cbd salve to make cbd oil

Proper storage is essential to maintain your CBD balm. “The balm needs to be stored in a container that will neither interact with the product nor allow heat or light in to degrade it,” Bone stated.

You’ll also need the following supplies:

There are some ingredients you can add to a CBD balm to make it potentially more pain-relieving, especially for general muscle aches and conditions like arthritis. “Adding products such as menthol or emu oil can make a product that is good to use on muscle tenderness,” Bone suggested.

How do you make a pain relief balm?

There are some ingredients you can add to a CBD balm to make it potentially more pain-relieving, especially for general muscle aches and conditions like arthritis. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

When choosing an essential oil for your CBD balm, be aware that different terpenes in essential oils may exert different effects on the body. “For example, using lavender can make the balm more soothing. Adding lemon may help with mood, while peppermint may boost energy,” said Bone.

In this step-by-step guide, you’ll learn how to make your own CBD balm at home and how to choose the best ingredients for pain relief.

CBD balms, also called CBD salves, have become popular supplemental treatments for muscle pain, inflammation, and skin conditions. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

On the other hand, emerging studies are revealing that raw THCA and CBDA have some pretty groovy perks too. THCA is showing a promising ability to reduce inflammation, muscle spasms, arthritis, and cancer. CBDA also fights inflammation and tumor growth.

It is best to store your finished cannabis salve in a cool dark location because light degrades cannabinoids. The amber and cobalt jars we use block UV light, which protects the salve if I leave it out.

How Does It Work?

Therefore, that is exactly what we’re going to do in this recipe: make cannabis oil, and then the salve. But first: “what kind of cannabis should I use in my oil or salve?”

I suggest monitoring the oil temperature with a probe thermometer if possible. Because oils have a higher boiling point (or “smoke point”) than water, the oil will not appear to be as hot as it really is! For example, the oil may be well over 212 degrees but not visibly bubble and boil like water would at the same temperature.

Disclosure: This post may contain affiliate links to products for your convenience, such as items on Amazon. Homestead and Chill gains a small commission from purchases made through those links, but at no additional cost to you.